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Astronaut flails around after getting 'stuck' in microgravity in an intriguing video

'Some people think that there is no gravity in space. In fact, a small amount of gravity can be found everywhere in space.'

Astronaut flails around after getting 'stuck' in microgravity in an intriguing video
Cover Image Source: Reddit / u/not_a_profession

Astronauts go through a series of strenuous and intensive training sessions before their space mission. They adapt to everything including space food, the functionality of day-to-day chores and, of course, zero gravity. The palpable sense of weightlessness that astronauts experience in space sets apart the feeling of being on Earth. The process is often referred to as "microgravity," or "micro-g." Moving or flying in zero gravity is a little challenging. Moreover, if you are wondering what it looks like, check out this video of an astronaut floating around in a spaceship without any handles for support.



 

 

Sometimes, microgravity is called zero gravity, but there is a slight distinction. Micro means very small. As per NASA, microgravity indicates “the condition in which people or objects appear to be weightless. This is what we're talking about when we see objects and people floating in space." Since there is some amount of gravity in the room, the astronaut wasn't permanently suspended as shown in the video. Just like how NASA puts it: "Gravity causes every object to pull every other object toward it. Some people think that there is no gravity in space. In fact, a small amount of gravity can be found everywhere in space. Gravity is what holds the moon in orbit around Earth. Gravity causes Earth to orbit the sun. It keeps the sun in place in the Milky Way galaxy."

Some people in the comment did share suggestions on how the astronaut can get out of this limbo. A Reddit user u/LambBrainz said: "Assuming you're not naked, you can throw something in the opposite direction of where you want to go. That'll at least get you moving." However, u/Gamer_Guy81 shared a hilarious trick of a fart and commented: "Would a fart create enough force to propel him forward? Honestly, I'm curious because we've all those big ones that rumble." While u/TheLorax66 noted: "Conservation of momentum. You would move in the direction opposite to the shoe throw at a velocity equal to the velocity of the shoe times the ratio of the shoe's mass to your own. Then you'd keep moving at constant velocity until air friction stopped you, or some other force acted on you."

If this gave you the willies, then these window seat pictures from space will definitely perk up your mood. According to My Modern Met, NASA astronaut, Mike Hopkins has been tweeting some of the breathtaking aerial views of Earth and its atmosphere from Resilience—a SpaceX Crew Dragon spacecraft. So, if you're ever planning a space trip, make sure to choose the window seats because if not, you're gonna miss out on a lot. 



 

 



 

 

Hopkins, as commander, is in charge of all aspects of flight, from launch through re-entry. Sometimes this might get a little tedious, so he really takes his time to enjoy taking in this beautiful view which is clearly not an everyday thing. He shows images of Earth from above as well as amazing snapshots of smaller spacecraft and equipment arriving at Resilience. He also depicts how serene and quiet the Earth appears from a distance. “Sometimes, on a day off, you just have to stare at the clouds,” says Hopkins.



 

 



 

 



 

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