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Artist creates hilarious comics capturing the life of retail workers, and it's so relatable

Stephen Beals captures the disillusionment of workers in the retail industry in his comic book 'Adult Children.'

Artist creates hilarious comics capturing the life of retail workers, and it's so relatable
Image source: Facebook/adultchildrencomics

Editor's Note: This article was originally published on February 15, 2022

When life gets hard, sometimes the best way to cope is to laugh at your own problems. And let's face it, these are some pretty bleak times and we could use some humor. Stephen Beals has been drawing from everyday issues to create art that is both funny and in some ways dark. Beals has always had a deep interest in comics and has been working "out of pure love for the art form," reported Bored Panda. He titles his comics "Adult Children" and said it was because "adulthood seems to be a myth we tell children in order to get them to behave." Beals draws from all walks of life and into everyday situations in the retail sector. The retail industry is one of the most overworked and underpaid sectors in America, and many employees are becoming disillusioned with not just work but also life. 



 


At a time when the income inequality is getting wider than ever, a large portion of workers across industries is all living on the edge and a medical emergency from bankruptcy. Beals captures the everyday helplessness and exhaustion through humor. Beals' work resonates with people and helps us laugh at our own problems. Here is some of his brilliant work:

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You can follow his work on Facebook, Instagram, and his website.    

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