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'An Irish Goodbye' star who went back to his part-time day job as Starbucks barista wins an Oscar

James Martin made history at the 95th Academy Awards when he became the first person with Down syndrome to win an Oscar.

'An Irish Goodbye' star who went back to his part-time day job as Starbucks barista wins an Oscar
Cover Image Source: Seamus O'Hara, James Martin and Tom Berkeley attend the 95th Annual Academy Awards on March 12, 2023 in Hollywood, California. (Photo by Emma McIntyre/Getty Images)

James Martin, a Starbucks barista and part-time actor with Down syndrome, made history on March 12, 2023, when he became the first person with Down syndrome to win an Oscar. Martin bagged the honor for his role in a live-action short film called "An Irish Goodbye".

The 23-minute drama, directed by Tom Berkeley and Ross White, follows Martin's character Lorcan as he reunites with his estranged brother Turlough—played by Seamus O'Hara—following their mother's passing. Martin's performance was widely praised, and he and his co-stars and directors took to the stage to accept the award for Best Live-Action Short.

Image Source: (L-R) Ross White, James Martin, Tom Berkeley, Seamus O'Hara, winners of Best Short Film (Live Action) award for ’An Irish Goodbye’, attends the Governors Ball during the 95th Annual Academy Awards at Dolby Theatre on March 12, 2023 in Hollywood, California. (Photo by Emma McIntyre/Getty Images)
Image Source: (L-R) Ross White, James Martin, Tom Berkeley, Seamus O'Hara, winners of Best Short Film (Live Action) award for ’An Irish Goodbye’, attends the Governor's Ball during the 95th Annual Academy Awards at Dolby Theatre on March 12, 2023, in Hollywood, California. (Photo by Emma McIntyre/Getty Images)

The 31-year-old Martin has been working part-time at a Starbucks branch in Belfast for some time, and in an interview with the Daily Mail, he explained that he enjoys helping out with customers. He also works as a chef at a nearby Italian restaurant, Scalini's, where he prepares dishes such as garlic bread, meatballs, salads, mussels and chips.

In the same interview, Martin spoke about his experiences as an actor with Down syndrome, saying that anyone can act, regardless of their disability. He cited Stephen Hawking's appearance on "The Simpsons" as an example of a person with a disability who was a talented actor. Martin emphasized the importance of treating people with disabilities like adults and not judging them based on their appearance.



 

According to The Independent, following Martin's Oscar win, Ireland's president, Michael D Higgins, praised the Irish film industry and its contribution to Irish life. He and his wife, Sabina Coyne, also announced that they would be hosting a St Patrick's Day reception to celebrate the Irish Film, Audio-Visual and Performing Arts Communities at Aras an Uachtarain.



 

Martin's win is significant not only because he is the first person with Down syndrome to win an Oscar, but also because it highlights the importance of inclusion and representation in the entertainment industry. People with disabilities are often underrepresented in film and television, and their stories are not often told on screen. Martin's win serves as a reminder that everyone has the potential to be an actor and that everyone's story is worth telling.



 

In recent years, there has been a growing movement to increase diversity and representation in the entertainment industry. This movement has been driven in part by the success of films such as "Black Panther," which featured a predominantly Black cast and crew, and "Crazy Rich Asians," which featured an all-Asian cast. These films demonstrated that stories featuring underrepresented communities can be commercially successful and critically acclaimed.

Martin's win is another step forward in this movement and it is a testament to his talent and hard work. As more and more people with disabilities are given the opportunity to tell their stories on screen, we can hope for a more inclusive and diverse entertainment industry that reflects the richness and complexity of our world.

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