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A pigeon is stalling the removal of a Christmas tree in this Yorkshire town center

The Beverley Town Council was informed that it was illegal to remove the tree because it was against the law to damage the nest of a wild bird.

A pigeon is stalling the removal of a Christmas tree in this Yorkshire town center
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Ralphs_Fotos

Usually, towns or cities are not concerned about a nest or an animal living on a tree before removing it but that's not the case with this Yorkshire town center in the UK. A Christmas tree is still placed in a town center as a wild pigeon built its nest among the branches, according to BBC. The Beverley Town Council was informed that it was illegal to remove the tree because it was against the law to damage the nest of a wild bird.



 

Reportedly, the tree was meant to be removed in January but five months later, the bird still has its nest on the tree.  "When members of the public reported that birds were nesting in the tree, the Town Council realized it had to follow the law and leave the tree in place so as to not disturb them," Councillor Alison Healy told HullLive.

"As time has gone by, the once green needles of the tree are now copper in color, but remarkably very few have fallen off, so it is still thick with foliage. However, because people have been understandably asking the Town Council why we have not removed it yet, notices have been placed on the tree explaining the situation," Alison added.



 

She said that the town council has been receiving a "lot of comments" on the wilting Christmas tree. However, she said that it was a unique situation for the council and the bird was being regularly checked by East Riding of Yorkshire Council officers. According to The Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981, wild birds and their eggs are supposed to be protected. It basically means that it is illegal to damage or destroy the nest of any wild bird while it is used or being built.



 

Andy Gibson from Yorkshire Wildlife Trust told BBC that usually, wood pigeons migrate to France or Spain during the winter but if the weather is warm they tend to stay in the UK. "It isn't just about moving the nest, you are killing the eggs, you are killing the chicks [if you disturb it]," he said. Gibson added, "In a month's time the eggs will have hatched. A bit more time and the chicks will have fledged and then you can take it down. And next year's plans for Christmas may include removing the Christmas tree before June."



 

Talking about birds, May 6th was an important day for people in Gloucestershire town in the UK as about 1000 people attended the crowning of its "Coronation Chicken" called Buffy, at Cinderford's Triangle. The Mayor of Cindeford Cllr Roger Sterry said that he found it hard to choose a winner from the 34 chickens that had applied for the role.

According to Buffy's owner, Anne Lameraft, she is a Buff-Orpington Sussex cross and is "a bit of a show-off and a bit of a poser." She is reportedly one of the eight chickens Lameraft has in her small flock. Lameraft said: “It’s really exciting. I can’t believe it. I’m grinning from ear to ear. All this excitement over a little chicken."



 

Talking about the crowning of the coronation chicken, Holland, the town crier, shouted while making the announcement: "Oyez, oyez, good people of Cinderford and all across our great nation, we gather here today for this moment of elation.

For as in our capital, we crown King Charles III, right here in Cinderford, we too crown our bird. Hip hip hooray, hip hip hooray, hip hip hooray, well done Queen Buffy." The crowd responded with three big cheers and a clap for the crowned chicken.

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