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7-year-old boy donates money he saved for Disney World trip to Ukrainian children

7-year-old boy donates money he saved for Disney World trip to Ukrainian children

Nicholas learned of an outreach effort being held to raise money for victims of the war and wanted to give the money he'd saved up.

A 7-year-old boy is giving up on his dream of a trip to Walt Disney World to help Ukrainian children. Nicholas Perrin of Bucks County, Pennsylvania, had been saving money for more than two years to make the trip to Florida to experience Walt Disney World. He had saved $250 and was inching closer to his dream when Russia attacked Ukraine. Perrin heard stories of families being forced to flee their homes in Ukraine and asked his mother if he could give the money he had saved to get toys for the children who had been displaced. "Because they aren't at home anymore," said Nicholas, reported 6abc. It was at church that Nicholas learned about the outreach effort for the war victims.

PRZEMYSL, POLAND - APRIL 09: People, mainly women and children, pass through Przemysl train station after fleeing from war-torn Ukraine on April 09, 2022 in Przemysl, Poland. According to the United Nations, since Russia invaded Ukraine on February 24 upward of 10 million people have been displaced and at least 1,100 civilians have been killed. (Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)

 

Nicholas' family agreed with him and donated the money he had saved up, and also gave supplies, through Christian Life Center in Bensalem. The money will be donated to Convoy of Hope Ukraine and the supplies will be sent to United Ukrainian American Relief. The 7-year-old is hoping the money helps the Ukrainian people and also wished a lot of "luck" to the people of Ukraine. Perrin has already installed a new savings jar in the hope that he can one day visit Disney World.



 

Ukrainian women and children make up the majority of the people who have fled and sought refuge in neighboring countries. After Russia attacked Ukraine, President Zelenskyy declared martial law, which prevents men between the ages of 18 and 60 from leaving the country. The EU asked all 27 member nations to grant asylum to Ukrainians for up to three years. "I think we will have to prepare for millions," said EU Commissioner for Home Affairs, Ylva Johansson at the time, reported DW. Most of the refugees have fled to Poland, Hungary, Slovakia, Moldova and Romania.



 


In one case, a boy was left with no choice but to travel alone to Slovakia. As we reported, the 11-year-old made the long arduous journey to Slovakia on his own with nothing but a backpack, his passport and a phone number scribbled on his hand. The Slovakian authorities hailed him as a hero. “He won over everyone with his smile, fearlessness and determination worthy of a real hero,” read the statement. "He came all alone from Zaporizhzhia because his parents had to stay in Ukraine," said police spokeswoman Denisa Bardyova. At the time, his mother posted a video message thanking Slovakian authorities. "I am very grateful that they saved the life of my child," said the boy's mother, Julia Pisecka, in a video message. "In your small country, there are people with big hearts," she added.



 


His relatives picked him up from the border. Julia Pisecka, the boy's mother, had to initially stay back to take care of her ailing mother. As Russian shelling intensified, Pisecka decided to take the risk and try escaping the country to be reunited with her family. She, along with her mother, took "a very difficult journey on the evacuation train" to be reunited with her kids, said the authorities. Slovakian authorities confirmed the family had been reunited. They thanked police officers on both sides of the border for helping the family cross over and reunite with the boy. "Mom, grandma, and five siblings are all well, together and safe. Thank you to all who help refugees from Ukraine," said the Slovakian authorities.



 


At least 4.5 million Ukrainians have fled the country following Russia's attack, reported UNHCR. Around 12 million people are believed to be stranded or unable to leave areas affected by the fighting, reported BBC. Poland has so far taken the highest number of refugees—2.6 million. Romania and Hungary follow with 692,501 and 424,367 people. 


Russia's attack on Ukraine is a developing story, and we’ll update as we learn more. Information is swiftly changing and Upworthy is committed to providing the most recent and verified updates in our articles and reportage. However, considering the frequency in developments, some of the information/data in this article may have changed since the time of publication

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