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101-year-old woman who's been working for the last 26 years shares tips to have a long, happy career

While most of us dream of retiring early, Jayne (101) not only works part-time at a craft store but she also plans to continue this as long as she can.

101-year-old woman who's been working for the last 26 years shares tips to have a long, happy career
Cover Image Source: (L) LinkedIn | JOANN stores, (R) Instagram | @maggie.husvar

We have often heard people saying that as you work more, you live less. But it is not the case when working is the secret to a long life. While most of us dream of retiring early, 101-year-old Jayne Burns not only works part-time at a craft store in Ohio - JOANN stores - twenty minutes away from her house, but also plans to continue so as long as she can. She claims her work as the secret to her long life and she doesn't want to retire anytime soon, as per CNBC. When her coworker Maggie HusVar - who goes by @maggiehusvar on TikTok - asked Burns to share advice from her experienced life, the elderly suggested, "Keep moving." For her, "working has (also) helped" to live a longer and happier life. Burns accepted the job 26 years ago, in 1997, after her husband's demise and now, she appreciates what she does and wishes to continue doing it.


 
 
 
 
 
View this post on Instagram
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Maggie HusVar (@maggie.husvar)


 

 

Donna Burns, her daughter, was working part-time at the store and recommended her for the position, thinking it would be a nice respite from her grief. "I enjoy what I do, so I want to keep doing it. I'll work for as long as I can or as long as they'll have me," she shared with CNBC. "Staying busy keeps you from focusing on your aches and pains," she said and added: "It makes it easier to keep going." The centenarian, who worked as a bookkeeper for the majority of her career, tried retiring numerous times in her 70s and 80s, only to "unretire" a few months later because she missed her work life and lunch breaks with her coworkers. People who wish to devote themselves to their careers should surround themselves with decent employees, according to Burns, who was born in 1922. 


 
 
 
 
 
View this post on Instagram
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

A post shared by Maggie HusVar (@maggie.husvar)


 

 

Her schedule at the store varies, but in the coming week, she will work three days from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. to handle bales of fabric. The job demands good eyesight and some physical strength, but Burns says she has no trouble with it at all except for the thick vinyl fabric. "I was into fabric, so the manager asked me if I wanted to work. I started working with him and liked it and stayed there," the centenarian recalled while talking to TODAY. Living an unusually long and healthy life may appear to be a genetic gift, yet longevity did not run in Burns' family. Her mother died of an aneurysm in her forties, and her father died at 65. It sure seems like she focuses more on her quality of life and less on the quantity of it. 

Image Source: JOANN stores
Image Source: LinkedIn/ JOANN stores

 

Burns revealed some more longevity suggestions in honor of her milestone birthday last month, on July 26. She is a cancer survivor who used to limit her sugar intake, but she no longer does because she enjoys sweets. She maintains good skin care and a beautification regimen. "I was always active all my life doing things. So, I think that has helped more than anything," she says. "I use a moisturizer and makeup. I figured I did it all my life, so I'm not going to stop now," she added.

Her number one longevity tip, however, is to develop friendships, build true connections and find satisfaction in the presence of others. "It's important to find people who are friendly and kind," she says. "I enjoy talking to everybody I work with and meeting the customers who are very nice, even if some of them are surprised to see me at the cutting table."



 

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