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10 useful and practical things that people think can prove to be beneficial for everyone

It is human nature to always keep learning and adapting to our surroundings and these practical life lessons can prove to be beneficial in the process.

10 useful and practical things that people think can prove to be beneficial for everyone
Representative Cover Image Source: Pexels | Andrea Piacquadio

Every day we learn something new

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Andrea Piacquadio
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Andrea Piacquadio

There are always certain cases where you might not have the knowledge about something or maybe you are the one who could enlighten your fellow friends, families or community members about something they previously didn't know about. Mutual growth is facilitated by the exchange of insightful knowledge and encouraging comments. Giving out some valuable information you know has an inductive effect on other people and it enables them to learn as much as you do. u/West_Sample_4702 asked the Reddit community to share that one thing they wished more people would know. Whether it is about taking care of your mental health in a certain way or learning how crying can actually be useful to you, here are some of the most enlightening responses from the community that are going to make you a tad bit more aware of yourself and the world around you.

1. Continue moving your body

Representative Image Source: Pixabay/StockSnap
Representative Image Source: Pexels | StockSnap

Weight-bearing exercise (eg walking) promotes bone health. u/Standard_Flight_2088. When I broke my leg and it healed incorrectly and had to be rebroken, the surgeon was very adamant to not do anything with it in the split for the first 2 weeks, but once it's in the cast to walk on it as much I could that was comfortable. u/TracyMorganFreeman. If you have issues with your knees, walking on flat roads or footpaths can damage your knees further. In those cases, cycling can be low-impact good-quality exercise. My mom has osteoporosis, and she's forbidden from walking on anything other than grass or dirt. She cycles quite a bit and is very fit (touch wood). u/IllegalyBored

2. Be open to learning

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Mikhail Nilov
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Mikhail Nilov

Be smart enough to know how dumb you are. It's okay to be wrong, it's okay to learn new information and change your initial opinion of something. u/1d0m1n4t3. This is something interesting I’ve learned as an engineer because the first question we’ll ask is what kind. There are so many different fields and specific specialties that you will die not knowing everything. u/No-Account-8180. You’ll only be able to expand on your knowledge when you can admit how little you know and that there will always be more to learn. I was redundant, but this is probably one of the best examples on here! u/Bewitchingmoon

3. Spending time with yourself

Image Source: Pexels/ Photo by Joshua Abner
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Joshua Abner

Having some alone time, If only a few hours a week, is extremely healing. u/xItaliax. Too much alone time makes one socially awkward, which makes it harder to deal with people which makes you self-isolate to avoid awkwardness; it is a very vicious self-reinforcing cycle of social anxiety. u/NecessaryZucchini69. "All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy" is what my father used to say to me when I wanted to study instead of going out drinking with him. The 15-year alcohol habit I developed suggests that it was bad advice. u/The_Shape_Shifter

4. Knowledge about alcohol withdrawal

Representative Image Source: Pexels/cottonbro studio
Representative Image Source: Pexels | cottonbro studio

You can die of alcohol withdrawal. u/Moonlight_Dive. The local crazy drunk from my home country drank about 4 bottles of rum per day. He got mugged once and beaten so his only son came from abroad to help him. He forced him to quit cold turkey and it killed him. His body was so used to 4 bottles of rum per day that suddenly not having it shocked his organs and killed him. u/CAHTA92

5. Learn to sustain yourself

Representative Image Source: Pexels | cottonbro studio
Representative Image Source: Pexels | cottonbro studio

How to do basic household chores. Being able to sustain yourself is an important skill. u/streamstrikker. Trying to instill this in my 13-year-old stepdaughter's life. She goes between her mom's and stepdad's place and ours each week. I'm finding that she certainly doesn't have any responsibility at her mom's, things like cleaning up after herself, beginning to do her own laundry ..it's all done for her. I had this realization recently. I happily do her laundry for her only to realize I'm doing her no favors and it's time to back off and let her take on the responsibilities so she's not that kid at college with no idea how to do her own laundry or clean up after herself in her own space as well as shared spaces. It's really no fault of her she just hasn't had those responsibilities until now. u/Giraffe_Electronic

6. There can be two sides of the truth

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Timur Weber
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Timur Weber

That multiple views can be true at the same time. Example: Cancel culture can be problematic and people should be rightfully held accountable for their actions. One truth doesn’t somehow negate the other. Maybe just avoid extremes. u/in_a_new_direction. My biggest issue with the “people need to be held accountable” mindset is that way too many people on the internet have taken it upon themselves to be the ones to decide this when they are in no way involved in the matter or have the necessary facts. u/Square-Raspberry560

7. Crying is good for you

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Karolina Grabowska
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Karolina Grabowska

Crying releases hormones that help regulate emotions and your central nervous system. If you are a crier, let it out. Crying is something to be proud of, not the opposite. u/soupfarm. I am very against violence due to being physically abused as a kid and never want to inflict that type of pain on someone else. When I get really angry and have the urge to get violent I typically cry to stop myself from doing anything I would regret. I still remember a friend who made me so mad that I started crying because I didn't want to hurt them and they thought I was soft but the only thing keeping me from beating him up was crying and I am much bigger than him so it wouldn't have been pretty. u/brooksie1131

8. Learning basic etiquette 

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Helena Lopes
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Helena Lopes

Basic etiquette when in a public/social setting. u/StaindShady. There’s a busy escalator that goes from the station platform up to the concourse on my commute and at least once a week without fail someone will get off, take a single step forward, and just stop and look around to see where they’re going. I always wonder what’s going on in the heads of those people, like could they really genuinely not realize that there are tens of other people behind them trying to disembark a moving machine? Insane. u/fireworkslass 

9. Road safety tips

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Dominika Kwiatkowska
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Dominika Kwiatkowska

If you have a minor motor vehicle collision with another motorist, you need to move your car off of the roadway if it still can be driven. You're impeding traffic 'til you do so. u/thrwawaythrwaway_now. To piggyback off of this, the insurance company generally doesn’t need a police report and if you live in a decently large city the police may not be dispatched at all absent injuries or actual criminal activity. A lot of states don’t even require a police report be filed, simply that a person involved in a wreck notifies the local authority. u/jollygreenspartan

10. Requirement of media literacy

Representative Image Source: Pexels | cottonbro studio
Representative Image Source: Pexels | cottonbro studio

Media literacy. I cannot believe the bias in some of the “neutral” publications’ headlines. u/saltierthangoldfish. I agree. One thing I’d add is that media literacy involves eyeing all media pieces you consume with a critical eye, but it doesn’t have to mean that you stop consuming that media. All pieces of media will have some sort of bias, even if very subtle, as it’s all created by humans. Even when a journalist or publication chooses a certain story to publish, it’s because they believe it’s important, and more important than other stories they could tell instead. u/Top-Abbreviations-24

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