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10 things the younger generation believe that boomers did way better in their time

While boomers are being mocked for having traditional and outdated practices, these 10 things are not only missed dearly, but people also agree that they were worth appreciating.

10 things the younger generation believe that boomers did way better in their time
Representative Cover Image Source: Pexels | Andrea Piacquadio; Reddit | u/WrexSteveisthename

I'm with you on this one. 

Representative Image Source: Pexels| Hasan Albari
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Hasan Albari

There have been several conflicting interests and differences between people due to generational gaps. Right from beliefs and celeb favorites to how things are done, each generation has its style and method. Many newer generations have a strong conflict of thought with the boomers. The latter, who had more traditional and concise thinking, have been termed "outdated" or "irrelevant" by the younger generations. However, Reddit user u/Youssef4573 shared a post asking the millennials and GenZs to point out things they feel boomers have done right. Though just a few, people have pointed out interesting factors that gave boomers the upper hand and here are 10 of them.

1. Common courtesy and consideration for others

Representative Image Source: Pexels| Cottonbro Studio
Representative Image Source: Pexels| Cottonbro Studio

Just because I’m in public doesn’t mean I want to be filmed. Yeah, I know, legally you can, but common courtesy, people. u/Jayne_of_Canton. I was recently abroad and there was an “influencer” filming herself discussing her trip in the mirror of the women’s airport restroom. It was in the big mirror where the sinks are by the door, so you could see everyone who walked in and out of the restroom in the video. She snapped back at me when I told her not to film me. I don’t see how anyone could think it’s acceptable to film in a public restroom and feel like that should be illegal if it isn’t already. u/takemeoutofoffice

2. Made movies worth spending time on

Representative Image Source: Pexels| Andres Ayrton
Representative Image Source: Pexels| Andres Ayrton

Can we fix the audio in movies so that the music and sound FX aren’t drowning out the dialogue? u/Caloso89. If we're fixing movies, can we also make the lighting in scenes bright enough I can see them? u/suzyqzee. Or the music. I've encountered stuff where the music is playing so loud I can't hear what people are saying. Also, I know there's some kind of technology being used that makes it incredibly hard to understand dialogue, even in normal scenes, but I don't know enough to know what it is. I just know it exists. u/Creativityonly2.

3. The luxury of buttons

Representative Image Source: Pexels| Mike Bird
Representative Image Source: Pexels| Mike Bird

I don't need everything in my car to be electronic, some stuff needs buttons. u/LambhorginiHEAT. Bought a new car last May. They changed the air conditioner control and the volume on the radio to some electronic junk. A knob you turned was so much easier and more convenient. u/---JackDontCare---. This was the big thing for me in my last car - trying to adjust volume or change songs while driving is way more dangerous when it’s all touch screen. Thankfully my current car has physical knobs for everything. u/GeekdomCentral.

4. The tangibility of menus

Representative Image Source: Pexels| Lina Kivaka
Representative Image Source: Pexels| Lina Kivaka

I think menus should be tangible. u/Limp-Management9364. QR codes kill the vibe. We’re all on our phones constantly throughout the day and then when you go to spend some quality time with someone, it’s another excuse to whip out the phone and stare at it. There’s an intimacy to a physical menu. You’re looking at what the other person is reading, you’re each pointing to parts of the menu. You’re noticing the lighting of the restaurant. QR codes feel chintzy and kill the ambiance completely. u/VapeDerp420.

5. Created finished products for games 

Representative Image Source: Pexels| Markus Spiske
Representative Image Source: Pexels| Markus Spiske

When I was your age, you only had to pay for a video game once to own it. u/CatonCruthby. And they worked and were complete when you bought them! Now they have to update it constantly to fix bugs, add content that was supposed to be in the game already, add content you have to pay for, etc. u/AlsoARobot. I would give my anything to pay 99 cents to play a normal, simple puzzle game that isn't batter-dipped in ads and malware. I didn't know what we had back then. u/Lonesome-Pine.

6. Maintained basic rules that kept etiquette in check 

Representative Image Source: Pexels| Karlina Grabowska
Representative Image Source: Pexels| Karlina Grabowska

Be aware and courteous in your behavior in public and social settings. Don't yell-talk while a musician is playing at a concert. Talk between songs or go to the lobby. Wait for a whistle/stoppage of play at a sporting event to get out of your seat, if you can. Don't talk on speakerphone in public. Use headphones for phone songs/games/videos. If the waiting room/subway/bus is crowded, your bag does not get its own seat. Don't douse yourself in perfume before a flight. Being considerate of how we affect others around us is basic manners and bare-minimum-level empathy. u/Different-Nature8269.

7. Designed sturdy and durable furniture 

Representative Image Source: Pexels| Teddy Yang
Representative Image Source: Pexels| Teddy Yang

Today's furniture is so disappointing. Everything is $300+ but made of particle board and breaks or scuffs the moment you put it together. Seems like no one has any passion or pride in anything anymore. u/AlternativeStudio364. Yeah, the furniture I grew up using is still rock solid, the furniture I own is all shite. u/Optimal-Tip3452. My uncle just gave my nephew, who is 11, his old bedroom set from when he was a kid and it looks almost brand new. This set is freaking 50 years old! Nothing we buy now is lasting even 5 years. I also still have a dresser and night tables from my great-grandmother. u/breakitupkid

8. Being smart and to the point 

Representative Image Source: Pexels| Nicole Michalou
Representative Image Source: Pexels| Nicole Michalou

Don't get it twisted. Empathy is by and large, a good thing and it takes some serious doing for me to say it's gone too far. But collectively, we've become people who are willing to throw every last bit of energy fighting against every slight and making sure our pet cause gets top billing to the point of fighting amongst each other even if we're in almost complete agreement otherwise. Emotional energy, like any other kind of energy, is very much a finite resource. Whereas boomers could at least generally agree to disagree and get on with things. u/almighty-smiley

9. In-person interactions

Representative Image Source: Pexels| Jopwell
Representative Image Source: Pexels| Jopwell

Talking to people. There is a lot more depth to the interaction when you have it vs just text. -u/marsumane. The amount of people who don't understand how simple, basic human interaction works, particularly on Reddit, is staggering. -u/WrexSteveisthename. Texting is what you do in between talking to people in person, it’s asynchronous communications that let you stay connected with your friends when no one would have the time to talk on the phone even if you like talking on the phone. -u/CryptographerFlat173

10. Constructive parenting 

Representative Image Source: Pexels| Josh Willinkins
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Josh Willinkins

Not letting your children rule the roost. When did it become acceptable to let your kids back-talk you, slap you, and climb all over shit in public places? etc. As we've gone about raising ours, I've witnessed so many parents around us just let these behaviors slide. It's kind of sad when I'm the one saying things like, "Did I just hear you say that to your mom?! That is not ok. You go and apologize right now!!" Then I get this stunned "deer in headlights" look back that tells me they aren't used to someone calling them out on their behavior. u/CobbleStonneVillain.

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