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10 small changes made by people in their lives that helped them to be lot happier

Small changes can make a huge difference and these people are sharing what transformed their lives for the better.

10 small changes made by people in their lives that helped them to be lot happier
Representative Cover Image Source: Pexels | Yan Krukau; Reddit | u/omgitskells

Little changes make a big difference.

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Andrea Piacquadio
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Andrea Piacquadio

Small adjustments in day-to-day life can add up to significant benefits in the long run. We can call it the snowball effect. Imagine saving a penny each day for a couple of years and you can turn it into a huge sum of wealth in the future. You may apply the same rules for your development as well. It might not be easy changing your habits at first or within a day. However, for the sake of your future, making small changes in your life might give you favorable results someday. u/05tn3021 asked the Reddit community, "What's something small you started doing that makes you drastically happier?" People showed up to disclose all things big and small that affected their livelihood and made them happier in the long run. So scroll through to gather some inspiration from these folks who took small steps towards the light at the end of the tunnel and finally found their happy place and a calmer state of mind.

1. Not picking up other people's responsibilities

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Anna Shvets
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Anna Shvets

I used to think 'work your wage' was a petty response and an excuse to be lazy, but I realized that it's so true. I've always been one of those to jump in and help, stress about things not getting done, etc., so every employer ends up treating me like management without the title or salary. Which...why? Why should I stress and pick up everyone else's slack if I'm not getting paid to do so? Now I stay in my lane and still handle my work timely but don't stress about doing everything right away. u/omgitskells

2. Getting a pet

Representative Cover Image Source: Pexels | Lisa Fotios
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Lisa Fotios

I brought my son a dog when he was struggling post-lockdown. It helped him almost instantly, but I didn't realize how much having him helped me too. Being around animals and nature is so underestimated as a cure for the modern world's detachment or rather its attachment to meaninglessness. I think we are sold the idea the things that matter in life are 'things,' but the simple unconditional love and presence you have with your pet is far more powerful and adds actual meaning that enriches your life and theirs. u/--lll-era-lll--

3. Started solo traveling

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Jeshoots.com
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Jeshoots.com

Solo travel. I never used to travel because it was hard to coordinate with others and when I did, I had to plan something everyone going would enjoy, often sacrificing what I wanted to do. Now, I try once a year to go on a trip I want just for myself with no one else to please. Last year, I went to a farm and hung out with some awesome animals and painted. This year, I'm going to a concert and staying in a nice hotel downtown. - u/ima_little_stitious

4. Learning something new

Representative Image Source: Pexels | daniyal ghanavati
Representative Image Source: Pexels | daniyal ghanavati

Started learning the names of the plants and birds I see every day. Sounds dumb but I live in a metro area and was treating the nature around me like visual white noise. Once I started learning the names of what’s around me, I started really seeing it and then I suddenly saw it everywhere. That kind of noticing has really enriched my life. I love walking past a bush and thinking, 'Forsythia!' like it’s a friend I recognize. It makes me feel like I’m part of my environment rather than just existing inside it. u/euphonicbliss

5. Refusing invitations

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Anete Lusina
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Anete Lusina

Started declining invitations I didn't feel like attending, such as going out with people I don't like that much, big social events with a lot of expectations and activities with friends that I wouldn't like to do if they weren't going. And all of that with a simple 'no thanks, I don't actually feel like it because X.' No excuses, no easy lies such as 'that day's my grandma's birthday,' no fake feelings like 'aw I wish I could but.' Being the owner of my free time and learning to say no without needing to give further explanations has done wonders for my mental health. u/rock-mommy. I set my iPhone to only accept calls from people in my contacts. Do I miss an occasional call that I need to take? Yep. They leave a message and I call them back. If it is a business or organization that I deal with semiregularly, I add them to my contacts. The important thing for me is that I get zero spam/scam calls anymore. Well, ones that ring through, anyway. On average, I was getting over 30 of them every day. I am much happier with this setup. u/froebull

6. Quitting alcohol

Representative Image Source: Pexels | energepic.com
Representative Image Source: Pexels | energepic.com

I have been in a major string of these lately: Stopped drinking alcohol - my body feels better and I have more fun without it. Started getting enough sleep - a healthy bedtime routine and the tools I needed to get to sleep despite insomnia. Started exercising daily - the serotonin it creates gets me through the day, even if I hate it. Drinking enough water - I didn't realize how much of my body discomfort daily was just dehydration. u/Foodiebride

7. Not tolerating toxic behavior

Representative Image Source: Photo by Yan Krukau/Pexels
Representative Image Source: Photo by Yan Krukau/Pexels

It’s interesting I’m seeing this just now. I had an incident at my old workplace (left after this happened) where my manager yelled and criticized me in front of everyone despite me having done my best to serve a high volume of customers during a rush. She had never talked to me like that before and I was hurt and angry. Still am, honestly, but I realized later it wasn’t me. She was stressed and angry and needed to take it out on someone. It’s completely inappropriate, so I left and never looked back, but at least I left knowing I didn’t deserve that. u/Zealousideal-Use7356

8. Quitting caffeine

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Anete Lusina
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Anete Lusina

Weaned off of caffeine. When I was a teenager, it was energy drinks + coffee. 18-20ish, hear it was a lot of coffee since I worked at a coffee shop. After quitting my job, I was too cheap to buy the yummy coffee, so I’d just have a black coffee at home. Then I started drinking black tea. I’m currently pregnant and just ran out of my black tea, but I’m moving, so I didn’t buy more. Therefore, I switched to what I had of my green tea and then decided to switch to just ginger tea altogether or any other caffeine-free tea. I feel so much more stable and plain water is the best thing you can drink for reliable energy. u/justblippingby

9. Listening to audiobooks

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Sanket Mishra
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Sanket Mishra

Audiobooks. I get them free from my library app and listen to them to and from work and when I do chores like dishes and laundry. Suddenly, I don't mind taking the time to fold my clothes perfectly because I'm being entertained while doing so. I also never had time to sit and dedicate time to reading, but this way, I can consume books on the go. I read four books in 2021. I read two books in 2022. I read four books in the first six months of 2023. Then, I got into audiobooks and read 17 books in the last six months of 2023. This year's looking even better. I'm already on my fourth book since New Year's! u/PrecariousThings

10. Going for walks

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Agung Pandit Wiguna
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Agung Pandit Wiguna

Going for walks. Drastically happier is probably an overstatement, but it has helped. u/midunda. There's a young man in my neighborhood who walks a mile to beans and brews for a coffee and then walks a mile back home every day, rain or shine. I noticed him every day for 6 months, then met him one day, grabbed a coffee and asked him about his walks. He told me he is in recovery and his mentor told him it would help and that he does this same walk twice per day. It's been 3 years now and every time I see him, I am so impressed with his strength, determination and willpower. He is an inspiration. u/Brief-Beautiful-585

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