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10 remarkable things that people think slowly disappeared since the past decades

People feel that these things or trends from the 2010s peaked for a while and gradually went away.

10 remarkable things that people think slowly disappeared since the past decades
Representative Cover Image Source: Pexels | Medhat Ayad, Reddit | u/SadBoiNoh

Change is the new constant

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Pixabay
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Pixabay

We live in a world of fast-paced innovations where each year we are introduced to things that drastically change our lives. We get accustomed to the progressive technologies and lifestyle, that we forget how we used to live without using all those. Chatbots replacing human representatives, influencers taking over social media, smartphones doing unthinkable activities, e-commerce overthrowing physical stores, over-the-top (OTT) media services ruling the entertainment industry and more such radical transformations have happened in the past decade. However, there are many people who wish that the world remained just the same as how it used to be when it wasn't so crammed with advanced technologies. It's mostly because those simpler times remind people of their younger selves when they did not have to learn so much about the complicated digital stuff. Reddit user, u/staclear, posted on the community asking the users, "What slowly went away in the past decade that no one noticed?" and people shared some interesting views in the comments. Here are the 10 notable things from the past decade that people feel have gone unnoticed.

1. Magazine shops

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Bagus Pangestu
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Bagus Pangestu

Magazine shops. The ones that sold obscure magazines that you can’t get at Walmart or the grocery store or even the big box bookstore. u/tangcameo. I used to buy magazines in languages I was working on learning, at the magazine stand, down the street from my office. So much more useful than textbook readings. You buy a general lifestyle magazine and it's full of writing about everyday things: people, relationships, homes, jobs, food, travel, consumer goods, etc. Plus with pictures for context. u/BellatrixLeNormalest.

2. 3D logo designs

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Rostislav Uzunov
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Rostislav Uzunov

3D logo designs have pretty much vanished. I don’t know the exact timeframe, but basically, every single major company’s logo has become minimalist over a very short period of time. -u/LeutzschAKS. I remember being in college in 2008 or so, studying art with an eye toward graphic design and graduation on the horizon. Interview after interview with these businesses looking for a designer to join all looking at my portfolio and saying that minimalism wasn't in right now, and they wanted someone tapped into the current hotness. Could I do some new work in 3D, or at least look like 3D? Left the field and now I just laugh. u/CdrCosmonaut

3. Digital services without subscriptions

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Alleksana
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Alleksana

I wouldn't say that no one noticed but we definitely let it slip right under our noses. There is not a single digital service I can think of that still has a buy-once policy. Everything has to be a monthly or yearly subscription which is obviously way better for companies. u/Jomri69. Even charities do this now. They'll be on the street asking for donations and then tell you they don't accept one-time donations anymore. They want you to sign up to give monthly. u/Immortal_Azrael.

4. Fro-Yo's

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Jessica Lewis
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Jessica Lewis

Frozen yogurt. Where the fuck is all the frozen yogurt? u/Fantomime. Yeah, all the frozen yogurt places have been replaced by boba tea shops. I’m sure in 10 years the boba tea shops will be replaced by some new trend. u/planetofthebass. My partner and I (college students) were just wandering around NYC last fall when we randomly found a froyo shop and had to go in because it was so nostalgic — for a glorious few years in our childhood, that shit was everywhere, and then it disappeared. u/mjg13X.

5. CD's and DVD's

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Brett Jordan
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Brett Jordan

Having actual physical copies of music and movies. People are so used to just watching YT, or using streaming services. Not saying some people don’t, but it’s more for a “collection” than actually that being the only way to have the material. I hadn’t bought a CD since at least 2008, and the only reason I bought DVDs at pawn shops cheap AF was to build a collection. u/RedditTosser1. I want hard copies of movies and video games as long as the physical discs still exist because then I actually own them. u/orangemaroon25.

6.  Colorful spaces

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Soly Moses
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Soly Moses

The color around us. Everything is now going grey, white or black. The colors are duller. u/SadBoiNoh. When I started seeing people complaining about colorful paint jobs in a house impacting the resale value was my breaking point. What's the point in owning a home if you're going to treat it like a rental that you're responsible for repairs in? u/standbyyourmantis.

7. Car antennas

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Sinitta Leunen
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Sinitta Leunen

Car antennas. You know what I mean. u/MD_Mike. I rewatched the 2000s TV show ALIAS recently and in the pilot episode, there is a fight scene in a parking garage where the heroine is pinned against a car hood and she reaches over to bend a car antenna and let it SPROING back up to whip her assailant's face. That was the moment I realized that whippy metal car antennae have gone the way of the dodo, and that whole fight scene would have to be done differently today. u/MdmeLibrarian.

8. Online search results

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Sarah Blocksidge
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Sarah Blocksidge

About 10 years ago, I used to make niche websites as a hobby and did SEO. I was pretty good at it. I could get my brand-new website on the front page of Google search results within a few months. Now I have a few related businesses, which I have websites for but can’t get them to rank for shit because it seems like there is no ranking anymore. The search results are so random and far more ads than there used to be. Depending on the browser, sometimes there aren’t even page numbers. Sometimes depending on what you’re searching for they immediately start thrusting images and videos at you. If I want those things I will look under the images and videos tabs. I’m looking for websites right now, Google. u/dinoro.

9. Good quality apparel

Representative Image Source: Pexels | MART Production
Representative Image Source: Pexels | MART Production

Decent quality clothes at affordable prices. u/Shakka74. True, now it’s either/or. I’ve gone buy-it-for-life on most purchases now, as I’d rather pay $150 for pants that last 10 years than ones from A&F that are $90 and make it two years. I will say, though, that the old navy slim jeans last ages for the price. I buy two pairs every few years and they hold their shape well, at only $25ish per pair. u/JorDamU.

10. Outright food recipes online

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Anna Shvets
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Anna Shvets

Finding a recipe online that doesn’t involve the author’s life story, the author’s pet’s life story, and the author’s pet’s squeaky toy’s life story. u/Tall_0rder. Oh yes. Give me the recipe, not how the food wraps you up in a warm hug, winter days with the sun streaming in, your grandmother and the smell of lavender. u/IamtherealFadida. I don’t know whether it’s just the recipes that I find, but I find it cringe when the author uses her (yes, mostly women posting) husband’s response as the measuring stick for how good the recipe is: “My husband even asked for seconds!” u/rrp120.

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