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10 people who got a 'useless degree' reveal how are they doing in life right now

People who studied degrees that are considered 'useless' spill the beans on their career journey and what they are doing now.

10 people who got a 'useless degree' reveal how are they doing in life right now
Representative Cover Image Source: Pexels | Andrea Piacquadio; Reddit | u/Sunlight72

Unconventional career decisions 

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Emily Ranquist
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Emily Ranquist

Society has many preconceived notions about education and that's how some fields are considered useless or lacking career prospects when that may not be the case. Going the unconventional route can be a bit scary but can be incredibly rewarding as well. Many individuals in the modern world have consciously chosen to pursue careers in unorthodox fields to show that success can be achieved anywhere. That's when u/PoisonousChicken asked the community, "Those who got a 'useless degree,' what do you do now?" people come up with various innovative yet intriguing ways of making their career unconventionally. Here are 10 of the most insightful answers that people provided.

1. Studied sociology but ended up in accounting 

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Kuncheek
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Kuncheek

I got a BA in sociology. Got accepted to law school but opted out because I was burned out and hated everything. I went to work at a hotel and randomly fell into accounting. It worked for me and now I have a CPA. Life is a journey. u/Winstonisapuppy. I also got my BA in sociology. I’m applying to mortuary school to become a funeral director. Life is a journey. u/threadbarefemur. Sociology BA here, too. I’ve helped a few new small businesses open - writing manuals, policies and procedures and setting up databases/inventory. A few management and record management jobs. Currently, working for my family business so my grandparents can retire. Who knows what is next? While I’m at it - does anyone know an accurate title for assisting new small business owners? It seemed kind of like consulting, but not sure of the specifics. u/tinynugget

2. Electrician with a psychology degree 

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Kelly
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Kelly

Got a psych degree and now I'm an electrician. In case anyone is wondering why the change, I realized at the end of the degree that I hate people and didn't want to hear the same sob stories over and over as a therapist, no matter if the money was better. Working with your hands and doing actual physical problem-solving was a better choice for me. u/MrSavageManiac

3. Professional glass artist

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Antoni Shkraba
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Antoni Shkraba

I have an art degree in glass art. I have been a professional glass artist since 2000. Just started on the 2nd largest commission of my career for a $60,000 suspended sculpture. - u/Sunlight72. I have looked at your profile. My goodness! My granddad was the second most famous Soviet crystal artist back in the day. When I was a kid, I used to come to his workshop and watch him create all this fantastic stuff. He would absolutely love your work! u/egorf. Hey, that’s very cool! Sometimes, when I am working, I remember that almost everything we can make in art glass today could have been made by glass blowers in the past. The tools and skills are the same. I am the only person in my family to make glass, and I think, it is really sweet that your granddad welcomed you into his workshop when you were little. Warm wishes to you. u/Sunlight72

4. Jewelry designer after studying botany 

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Noelle Otto
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Noelle Otto

Was told as a naturally artistic child that there was no point in pursuing art. I needed to "go to college and get a real job." So, following this practical advice, I got a bachelor's degree in botany. And a minor in art, and then did a one-year MA with a focus in metals. I own over a hundred houseplants and have been a jewelry designer and jeweler for about 25 years, and still paint and draw. u/Gibber_Italicus. Oh hey! I was taught that being a writer isn’t really a profession. Ditto on having a knack/love for history.  I got a BS in English and an MS in Adult Education, and have worked in business and finance for years.  I am writing a historical true crime book, though. u/eejm

5. Working in the film industry with a film degree 

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Martin Lopez
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Martin Lopez

Film degree. Work in film production. Be careful what you wish for. It's a rough lifestyle. High stress/high pressure work 13-18 hour days. Getting into a union, especially on films, requires a circus trick and a bit of luck (unless starting as a PA in the AD department). You're constantly looking for a new gig and the hours are always changing. It's fun in your 20s & 30s, but ages people quickly. Being a movie producer can be a 24/7 hour job and if you're working indies, you're constantly taking ridiculous financial risks, hustling for financing to pay for financing and putting out every sort of fire imaginable. It requires high intelligence, creativity, problem-solving skills and an iron stomach helps if you're independently wealthy and can survive bankruptcy. u/GibsonMaestro

6. Worked as a flight attendant despite having an accounting degree

Representative Image Source: Pexels | RDNE Stock project
Representative Image Source: Pexels | RDNE Stock project

I have a degree in accounting that I used for six months 30 years ago. My roommate was a flight attendant and was having a blast. I decided to apply, got accepted and spent 10 years traveling the world until I had kids. Once they were older, I got into property management. Getting my degree in accounting was easy for me, and I thought I would be good at it. However, I started hating numbers really quickly. u/Simple_Ecstatic

7. Self-employed and owns a house 

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Pixabay
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Pixabay

Make your way in the world. I have the very definition of a “useless degree“ (a BA from a disreputable public liberal arts college). But I found a career that worked for me. I’m self-employed, own a house, have a partner, and I’m doing fine (with less than zero help from my parents). So, fellow English majors, fellow underwater basket weavers and fellow sociologists, take heart. Be professional, charming, and smart. Show up on time and do your f****** best, even if you’re not 100% into it. Take jobs you’re overqualified for. Take jobs you’re underqualified for. Follow your instincts and seize your opportunities. It won’t work out for everyone (this being capitalism, after all), but it worked out for me. And it can be for you, too! I know this seems like a Boomer comment, but I’m 43. I felt absolutely hopeless (economically) in my 20s, but it got better. u/Fuzzy_Meringue5317

8. Working for a non-profit organization 

Representative Image Source: Pexels | RF._.studio
Representative Image Source: Pexels | RF._.studio

History degree. I went to law school and got my JD. Went to work for a private developer doing government and public relations stuff. Now, working for a nonprofit as an advocate for indigenous peoples working on social and political issues like human trafficking and climate change policy. u/nekosaigai. It sounds like you are making a difference. History degree as well. I thought I was on a path to getting my JD, decided not to go to law school. Got an MBA ten years later and now do retail consulting. u/Rokin1234

9. Started a concrete company 

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Anamul Rezwan
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Anamul Rezwan

My dad barely graduated 5+ years of college with an English degree. He wanted a business degree but was declined from the program numerous times. Couldn’t find a job after graduation. Saw a newspaper ad for a concrete gig. Learned how to do the stuff. After a few years on the job, he quit and started his own concrete empire, I don’t know the exact numbers, but from what I know, he pockets at least 2 million a year. His best advice is “All you need out of college is a piece of paper to prove to an employer that you can put in time, effort, and hard work. It doesn’t really matter what’s on the paper.” u/rainystarlight

10. Marketing for technology

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Christina Morillo
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Christina Morillo

Religious Traditions of the West taught me how to do random research and write papers while also fulfilling my need for very random trivia. I was mostly at college to play on computers on a sweet T1 ethernet connection, which is how I ended up in web development and then my ability to write led to me being in marketing for technology. I can tell you the pros and cons of using WordPress for your e-commerce site or I can tell you about child sacrifice in ancient Carthage. Either way, get ready for an information dump. u/katemonkey

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