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10 people share the small habits they adopted that changed their lives for the better

Small little changes can improve our lives for the better and these people are sharing small things they did to improve their quality of living.

10 people share the small habits they adopted that changed their lives for the better
Representative Cover Image Source: Pexels | Andrea Piacquadio, Reddit | u/Airam07

It's all about the one habit that makes or breaks. 

Representative Image Source: Pexels| Andrea Piacquadio
Representative Image Source: Pexels| Andrea Piacquadio

People try their level best to develop habits that will help them for the better in their future lives. Whether it's something as simple as waking up early or even taking one's plate into the kitchen after a meal, every habit adds to one's lifestyle and holds weight in different aspects of life. Often, it is these small habits that account for major life changes. Reddit user u/Evil_Attitudes shared a post on Reddit asking individuals to specify one habit that changed their lives. Right from simple things like making one's bed to a change in diet, the responses are impressive.

1. Cleaning and tidying 

Representative Image Source: Pexels| Nathan Cowley
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Nathan Cowley

Cleaning and tidying up your living space, even if it's just getting rid of the dust on some shelf or putting one book on your bookshelf, after time, your living space is much cleaner than it used to be and it's better for your health and mental health. u/Niarkoglob. Yes! I use the “5 Things” cleaning method from psychologist KC Davis. The idea is that any room truly only has five things that are causing mess: trash, dishes, laundry, items that are not in their place, and items without a place. I pick one category to start and go from there. Focusing on one “thing” at once helps me not feel overwhelmed by what’s in front of me. u/cactusontheside.

2. Exercising

Representative Image Source: Pexels| Andrea Piacquadio
Representative Image Source: Pexels| Andrea Piacquadio

Morning Exercise. Just 10 minutes of exercise each morning can boost energy, improve mood, and promote better health, leading to a more productive and positive day. -u/TearReresentative91 Find someone to work with. u/DETRITUS_TROLL. My someone is my dog. We do about 20 minutes of walks twice a day. Weekends are hour-long walks. The idea of letting her down is one I can't abide by, so we're out there rain, snow, or sunshine. u/thesamerainman.

3. Rejection 

Representative Image Source: Pexels| Ante Lusina
Representative Image Source: Pexels| Ante Lusina

Try to get rejected once a day. Not for anything in particular or even particularly important. You'll succeed less than you think. Advice from an old professor. He was a photographer and would 'try to get rejected' getting into all kinds of cool places, he got into a lot of cool places. u/iyf8tvuyuk. I think this is pretty much the same as doing at least one thing that scares you/makes you uncomfortable every day. A simple mental trick to make it a habit to get out of the comfort zone more often. u/trsegtrd.

4. Preparation 

Representative Image Source: Pexels| Mali Maeder
Representative Image Source: Pexels| Mali Maeder

Making tomorrow better than the night before. Lay out clothes, pack lunches, pack the bags going to work or school, and figure out what is for dinner so you can thaw it/put it in the slow cooker/etc. when you get up. That makes the morning a lot less stressful and that makes the day go better. u/LadyAlexTheDeviant. Absolutely! I accidentally turned off my alarm instead of hitting snooze one day and had about 1/3 the time to get ready that I usually do. If I hadn't taken out my clothing/made my lunch/etc., I don't think I would've gotten to work on time. u/vixeninjeans.

5. Hydration 

Representative Image Source: Pexels| Andrea Piacquadio
Representative Image Source: Pexels| Andrea Piacquadio

I live in a dry climate and I don't know how people don't just drink water all day every day. I have a bottle next to my bed i take swigs from every time I wake up in the night because I'm so parched. u/BaaBaaTurtle. If you drink a lot of water, make sure you replenish your vitamins + minerals with a good diet/supplements. For people who drink an absolute crap ton of water, you can wash out your micro-nutrients faster than normal. For ex: magnesium can be depleted quicker with an increased urination rate. u/Downvotes_inbound.

6. Learning something each day 

Representative Image Source: Pexels| Christina Morillo
Representative Image Source: Pexels| Christina Morillo

Spending a small amount of time each day learning something new, like a language or a hobby, can enhance cognitive abilities and personal satisfaction. u/Depressing_Side. Learning is a lifetime habit. So many people think they graduate high school, college, whatever, and they are done. But learning itself is something you should do every day. I taught my kids that if you didn't learn something new you wasted your day. Consistently they were above their peers because they chased learning, not grades. As a family we still all seek to consistently learn new skills, hobbies, talents, etc. u/No-Fishing5325.

7. Practicing gratitude

Representative Image Source: Pexels| PNW Production
Representative Image Source: Pexels| PNW Production

Writing down three things you’re grateful for every day can increase positivity, enhance well-being, and shift focus from negatives to positives. u/Substantial-Deisgn41. And it doesn't have to be anything deep. It can be, but it doesn't have to be. It can be as small as "I'm grateful I was about to find a parking spot closer to the entrance of my gym in the rain" or "I'm grateful my favorite ice cream is on sale." Regardless, recognizing the positives can help rewire pathways in your brain. u/BagApprehensive1412.

8. Saving money

Representative Image Source: Pexels| Karolina Grabowska
Representative Image Source: Pexels| Karolina Grabowska

Not necessarily a daily habit, more a monthly habit but putting money into savings. Even if it’s a small amount. Getting used to putting money away each month is a good habit. Even if it’s £25 each month at first get used to it and then increase it over time as and when you find you can manage it. u/TRFKTA. And when you increase your income, increase your savings by the same amount if possible! u/Porbulous.

9. Decluttering

Representative Image Source: Pexels|
Representative Image Source: Pexels| Andrea Piacquadio

Decluttering regularly so there is less “stuff” and visual clutter makes a huge difference. Another one is keeping surfaces clean as opposed to decorated/filled. Less is truly more and there is a lot of peace that comes with having less stuff. My ADHD makes my reluctance to discard stuff so much worse but I truly feel so much better when I have less stuff to worry about. u/Airam07.

10. Noting expenses

Representative Image Source: Pexels| Karolina Grabowska
Representative Image Source: Pexels| Karolina Grabowska

Write down your expenses for the day. This could get as simple or as fancy as you like (Excel file or notebook/pen, categorized or just a simple list). Helps you know how your budget is going, and if you want, you can use the data to understand your spending patterns. At the very least, you practice mindfulness around your spending. I've been doing this for 15+ years now and have a really clear picture of my spending patterns, how I need to prepare my budget, what my financial goals are, what expenses matter and what don't in terms of affecting budget. u/ps_nissim.

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