ANIMALS
FUNNY
INSPIRING
LIFESTYLE
NEWS
PARENTING
RELATIONSHIPS
SCIENCE AND NATURE
WHOLESOME
WORK
Contact Us Privacy Policy Cookie Policy
© GOOD Worldwide Inc. All Rights Reserved.

10 invaluable bits of advice people received that stuck with them throughout life

Everyone has priceless advice they have received that turned their life around. Here are the top 10 insights shared by people.

10 invaluable bits of advice people received that stuck with them throughout life
Representative Cover Image Source: Pexels | Pixabay, Reddit | u/midnighbrightlight

Listen, learn and embrace the journey!

Representative Image Source: Pexels| Andrea Piacquadio
Representative Image Source: Pexels| Andrea Piacquadio

Often in life's journey, one comes across some advice or life lesson that sticks with them. It may not have been relevant at the time but for some reason, it sticks with the person and as they go through life, they understand the value the advice holds. The same may be received from family and loved ones or even through the most random ways like strangers or a book or poster. u/No-Dragonfruit2506 posted on Reddit asking individuals to share advice that has stuck with them throughout their lives. Right from jobs, relationships, life and other aspects, people have shared noteworthy insights. These 10 are the top pieces of advice one can hold on to.

1. Acknowledge people

Representative Image Source: Pexels| RDNE Stock Project
Representative Image Source: Pexels| RDNE Stock Project

Be a person who makes everyone feel like somebody. u/Wide-Ad346 I worked at a big company once. That CEO knew everybody's name and I mean everybody. I started at the bottom rung and he said hello to me using my name after about 2 weeks. Just knowing my name made me feel incredibly special. Small things can make a big difference. u/RealHeyDana Anytime someone in retail/hospitality helps me, I give them a, “You’re the best!” It’s such a little thing but it always makes people happy. u/zugman

2. Balance work skills with people skills 

Representative Image Source: Pexels| RDNE Stock Project
Representative Image Source: Pexels| RDNE Stock Project

Sometimes, it's better to hire the person that you can stand working with for 12 hours a day over the more qualified candidate. People skills can go a long way. u/ExaminationDouble240 My last boss said we know you can do the job. In the interview, we find out if you want to do the job and if we want to work together. u/ptpoa120000 This is exactly the truth. Put your hard skills on paper and know your shit for sure, but when it comes to the interviews turn the charm up to 11. u/ivydesert

3. Prioritize peace over happiness

Representative Image Source: Pexels| Tobi
Representative Image Source: Pexels| Tobi

"I don't wish for you to be happy. I want you to be at peace with who you are. Happiness is fleeting, but when you're at peace that will carry you through the darker times of your life." u/midnightlightbright So true, most people forget that happiness is an emotion not a constant state of being. You feel lots of fleeting emotions every day, if you expect to stay constantly happy you're setting yourself up for failure. u/thegardenNYMPH

4. Avoid malice and evoke understanding 

Representative Image Source: Pexels| Karolina Grabowska
Representative Image Source: Pexels| Karolina Grabowska

Never attribute to malice that which can be adequately explained by stupidity. It helps prevent me from taking things personally- and I find the world is a gentler place when my temper takes the view of "bless their heart” over “what a b*tch”. u/GreatNoun I absolutely agree with this. When you come from a perspective of, "They are suffering, they are ignorant," rather than, "They should know better, what an asshole," it really makes you feel a lot better about other people's bullshit. u/Iam_Notreal

5. Feelings are meant to be felt not competed with 

Representative Image Source: Pexels| Andrew Neel
Representative Image Source: Pexels| Andrew Neel

Grief isn’t a competition. u/yellowchaitea On a similar note, neither is suffering. I have anxiety and the number of people who have blatantly told me that theirs is “way worse” than mine is ridiculous. u/Megaroni_n_cheeze More often than not, people will try to show that they can relate. However, they fail to realize that sometimes their experience does nothing for the person grieving. This does not take into account one-uppers and people who try to make every situation about themselves. u/SmilingDutchman

6. Pay heed to your intuition

Representative Image Source: Pexels| Chinmay Singh
Representative Image Source: Pexels| Chinmay Singh

Always listen to your gut instinct. If you have a bad feeling about a person or a situation there is probably a good reason you feel that way. u/California_Sun1112 I heard it explained one time that your subconscious processes information faster than your conscious mind does, so “instinct” is your subconscious coming to a conclusion before your conscious mind has had time to catch up. I thought that was pretty cool. u/Rheanne

7. Choose honesty

Representative Image Source: Pexels| Magda Elhers
Representative Image Source: Pexels| Magda Elhers

Tell the truth. The first time I owned up to breaking something when I was a kid, my dad was not angry. He calmly placed his hand on my shoulder and said, "Good on you for being honest". The first and greatest lesson in my memory. As Homer said, "Now for that happy period between the lie and the time it's found out." u/MehhicoPerth Like Mark Twain said, “If you only tell the truth, you never have to remember anything.” u/Microflunky

8. Avoid regret at all costs

Representative Image Source: Pexels| Liza Summers
Representative Image Source: Pexels| Liza Summers

Nothing is more expensive than regret. u/LogicalGent23 A friend has the saying that he’d rather regret trying something than regret passing it up. So he’s always game for doing stuff. Want to go to xxx amusement park in 2 weeks because I don’t have anyone else to go with? Sure, why not? Want to go to South Africa with me on my business trip because my boyfriend is afraid to go? Sure. u/sqqueen2

9. Don't settle for a partner when it comes to marriage

Representative Image Source: Pexels| Vera Arsic
Representative Image Source: Pexels| Vera Arsic

Who you marry makes up 80% of your happiness so choose wisely. u/starkpaella Similarly, I got, "If you aren't actively happy at least 80% of the time you're with him, he's not worth it." u/SpeckledRain I’d just add that it’s not possible to be happy always with life’s challenges, but what you do want is to be with someone you feel at peace with at least 80% of the time. u/consiouslydone

10. Spend your time prudently

Representative Image Source: Pexels| Pixabay
Representative Image Source: Pexels| Pixabay

No amount of money can buy back a second of time. If I pay someone to clean my house, I have more time with my kids. If I pay someone to mow my yard, I have more time. You can buy time, but you have to make the purchase and plan it proactively. You cannot recover and redistribute time spent working instead of living, but you can buy time to live better when you are not working. u/ThirtyLastCalls This is my life philosophy: Time is my most precious commodity: and I can never make more of it. u/SmilingDutchman

More Stories on Upworthy