NEWS
LIFESTYLE
FUNNY
WHOLESOME
INSPIRING
ANIMALS
RELATIONSHIPS
PARENTING
WORK
SCIENCE AND NATURE
About Us Contact Us Privacy Policy
© GOOD Worldwide Inc. All Rights Reserved.

10 important moments that made people realize they are getting older with changing time

Aging is a natural and inevitable process and sometimes there are only little moments around us that make us realize that we are, in fact, getting older.

10 important moments that made people realize they are getting older with changing time
Representative Cover Image Source: Pexels | Min An

Aging is a natural and beautiful.

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Victor L.
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Victor L.

Getting old is a very natural and inevitable part of our lives. As the years go by, our bodies and minds undergo various changes. Physically, we might notice a decrease in energy levels, changes in our appearance and the emergence of aches and pains. Mentally, our cognitive abilities can shift with experiences and wisdom accumulated over time. Reddit user u/SleepyItsNotSafeHere asked the community, "What are some signs that you are getting old?" Here are 10 of the most interesting answers that people had to offer.

1. Scroll a lot to find their birth year

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Ahmed Aqtai
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Ahmed Aqtai

When you have to scroll an insultingly large amount of time to find your birth year on an online form. u/PirateJohn75. I had to input my date of birth on a website recently. I was registering with a recruitment agency in an attempt to find a new job. It was the worst date of birth entry interface I have ever seen. I was unable to scroll. Instead, I had to tap to get to the next year. And every tap opened up a new page for some reason. It was horrible. u/Viazon. Whenever I am on Steam, they ask for a birthday to make sure you’re over a certain age for the violent content. I don’t even scroll to my decade anymore. u/edwadokun

2. Unable to find relevant pop culture content

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Karolina Grabowska
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Karolina Grabowska

When I realized I wasn’t pop culture’s target demographic anymore. u/dead_pixel_design. Recently I went back and watched a bunch of 90s ads on YouTube and I had this moment of realization - it was so obvious how we were being targeted with catchphrases and fashion and background music, but to us, it just seemed natural at the time. Even when we knew we were being pandered to, it still felt like part of "our" world. u/jseego. My husband and I often look at each other during a particularly insipid or perplexing commercial and just say “not for us” to acknowledge that we are no longer the target demographic. u/Lady_de_Katzen

3. Observing returning fashion trends

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Godisable Jacob
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Godisable Jacob

You’ve been around long enough to see fashion trends cycle through twice. u/TXSquatch. 18-year-olds dressed like me when I was 18 in the early 90s. u/BobMonroeFanClub. I think it's the "raiding my parent's closet" paradox. When kids want to look like they aren't kids they tend to borrow their parent's old clothes. So we see cycles of these trends happen again and again because it's always a little bit of the old stuff mixed with the new stuff. u/just_hating. I'm a late 30s millennial and it's wild seeing fashion trends recycling. I think I've been seeing bell bottoms on women here and there, which were a thing when I was in high school and of course the 70s. And now guys are wearing short shorts again, which was a thing when I was like 8 years old. And the mullet, I see that's making a comeback. u/_autismos_

4. No specific memories 

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Athena
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Athena

When you realize there is a whole year in your past that has no particular memories. Once you get settled in a routine that spans multiple years of living in the same place, working the same job, there aren't markers that help you remember the years anymore like there were in school. Suddenly you're unable to remember anything that you are certain happened in 2015 because that year was the exact same as the two years on either side of it. u/AdWonderful5920

5. Not understanding new words

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Edmond Dantès
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Edmond Dantès

You don’t understand new words, but you don’t care. u/Mocking_the_Stupid. It's pretty interesting though. I'm in my 40s and I frequent Twitch a lot and it's like they speak a different language. Goes to show you how languages morph over time. u/MrBrawn. It's the same with tech. When you're very young, mom and dad know it all and teach you. Not too much later though, they are clueless about the latest and you know it all and teach them. Eventually, you stop keeping up with the next thing and now you're the one going, "One more time, what exactly is a VPN and do I really need it? Do we have to do this on Slack - I don't get it. How do I make it do the thing?" It's not that you couldn't get it, you're not dumb, it's that you stopped caring, just like your parents in their turn, because as you age you narrow and focus your priorities and don't devote time to the lower ones. u/turkeypants

6. Valuing free time more

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Andrea Piacquadio
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Andrea Piacquadio

You start valuing your free time more and you get a bit pickier about how you want to spend that free time. u/chonkyclouds. God, I get so picky about my routine. Even if someone proposes something fun, I'm like, but this is my scheduled laundry-folding time. u/wombatIsAngry. It always blows me away when young people are like "I got bored and did _____, or I'm just bored, there's nothing good to do." I can't remember the last time I was just bored, like nothing to do and just being bored. There's so much I need to do and then do much I want to do, how on earth could a body be bored?! u/RUfu*ingkiddingme

7. Seeing buildings get torn down 

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Aleksandr Neplokhov
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Aleksandr Neplokhov

When they tear down a building that you remember getting built. u/jobless_han. I grew up on Long Island near NYC, and people say "Oh, the skyline must look all wrong with the World Trade Towers gone, and I have to reply that no, I left NY to go to college before the towers were a part of the skyline. u/WowsrsBowsrsTrousrs. Similarly, when you remember a time before something everyone else always just knew. Example: I remember when my town didn't have a stop light at a major intersection. It was an absolute cluster f**k. There are a lot of people around here who never knew the time before the light. u/HomicidalHushPuppy

8. Staying home more

Representative Image Source: Pexels | MART PRODUCTION
Representative Image Source: Pexels | MART PRODUCTION

You want to stay home a lot more. You’re OK with fewer friends. u/SanFranPeach. A great day in my life was in my early-mid 20s when I finally said, "No, I'm not going out for New Year's Eve - I hate it. I've always hated it but have just done it because that's what you do. It's so packed you can't get a drink but so loud you can't talk to your own friends much less anyone new, and the whole idea of a new year is fake, it's just a few seconds later and nothing's different. I'm never doing this again." And lo, I did not! I'm at home and comfy that night and not even watching some cheezy show with whoever that perma-host guy with the hair is and if I fall asleep before midnight, who cares? It's great. u/turkeypants

9. Not liking random noises

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Mary Taylor
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Mary Taylor

No longer tolerant to random noise. Or is that just me? u/lilaxlux. I work in an open office and it's impossible for me to block out the annoying noises. Have to constantly have my earbuds in. u/toshiro-mifune. I am less adept at separating noise from what I am concentrating on. If there is a lot of noise in the house I simply can't understand what my wife is saying even if I focus. She says it is frustrating for her, she has no idea. u/breakwater. A lot of noise in general, but deafening noises, is so disorienting and uncomfortable. Likely because my migraines are getting worse with age but I sure do like the quiet. u/CrimsonPermAssurance

10. Not caring what other people think 

Representative Image Source: Pexels | Andrea Piacquadio
Representative Image Source: Pexels | Andrea Piacquadio

I care less and less about what other people think. It’s my absolute favorite part of aging (I’m 41) u/harohelu. As someone always very bothered about what people think, I notice myself slowly moving in that direction now too (I’m 32), I have to say I feel a lot more relaxed compared with 10 years ago! u/dikkie91. I'm 52 and finally don't care about anything and looking forward to retiring, it's bliss. Savor my alone time more and more, sometimes nice being a hermit. u/key1234567. As a twenty-year-old, I felt volatile and on the brink of self-destruction. Now in my forties, I am calmer and more focused. u/KingBasten

More Stories on Scoop